When Doug and Dedra were closing in on their wedding date, August 18, 2021, they sent out invitations and waited for the RSVPs to come rolling in through the mail. The couple, who were getting married in Negril, Jamaica, received 109 RSVPs for the event, which means they were expecting more than one hundred people to show up and celebrate their union in style.

Because Doug and Dedra knew how many guests they were expecting, they had to shell out money for every single person one month ahead of their big day. During this time, they checked with guests to ensure that they were still going to arrive and enjoy the wedding celebration with the couple. Each guest confirmed they would be arriving and assured the couple that they did not have to worry.

“We asked four times from November to August if they would be in attendance, and every time they said yes,” Doug told Today’s TMRW. “If at any time they were unable to attend, we would have truly understood, but to no call, no show was a bit disappointing.”

Nevertheless, some of the wedding guests lied. Four guests and their plus ones simply did not show up for the wedding on the scheduled day. They didn’t even have the courtesy to call and cancel their reservation. Instead, they just pretended their absence would not be missed.

“We were all on WhatsApp, and neither one of us got a text or call from any of them letting us know they wouldn’t be able to make it,” Doug continued. “When we got home from Jamaica, there was still no call or text.”

The groom, Doug, decided that he would make these disrespectful people pay him back for the money he spent on them. Because the wedding venue was not cheap, Doug sent the four wedding guests invoices requesting that they pay him back for the dinner they skipped.

In the notes section of the invoice, Doug wrote:

“This invoice is being sent to you because you confirmed seat(s) at the wedding reception during the Final Headcount. The amount above is the cost of your individual seats. Because you didn’t call or give us proper notice that you wouldn’t be in attendance, this amount is what you owe us for paying for your seat(s) in advance. You can pay via Zelle or PayPal. Please reach out to us and let us know which method works for you. Thank you!”

Although it is a bit shocking that the groom would invoice no-shows, he did it in a very polite and respectful manner. It is hard to argue with the groom’s logic if you read his note closely.

Each dinner at the wedding costs the bride and groom $120. That means for every guest and their plus one, the couple had to pay $240, which is a lot to shell out for someone who simply skips the celebration without a call or text.

“DON’T BE OFFENDED WHEN I SEND THIS #INVOICE TO YOU,” his post states. “IT’S GONNA LOOK SOMETHING LIKE THIS. I’LL BE SENDING IT VIA EMAIL AND CERTIFIED MAIL… JUST IN CASE YOU SAY YOU AIN’T GET THE EMAIL.”

Do you think the groom should have invoiced no-shows to his wedding?

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